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ReActions March – 2017

Janice HeadshotIt’s finally spring and for many of you, that means break. We have a few things for you to consider on your well-earned time off. First, you’ll want to get acquainted with the latest additions to the periodic table of the elements; you have four more to teach! We have an interview with an ANS member who was part of the team that created two of them. Then, check out an online activity for Earth Day that turns your students into energy mix experts of the future. Finally, it’s not too soon to start planning your professional development activities for the summer. Check out three upcoming ANS workshops. I’ll be at the one in San Francisco. It would be great to see you there!

Janice Lindegard

March 10, 2017 Volume 39
Featured Highlight

Take a Break for Earth Day, New Elements, and Professional Development

Ideas and inspiration to take nuclear science into spring…and beyond.

Latest News

Hold off on buying that new Periodic Table; you’ve got four new elements to teach.

In 2016, the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) announced the names and symbols for four elements: nihonium (Nh), moscovium (Mc), tennessine (Ts), and oganesson (Og), respectively, for elements with the atomic numbers 113, 115, 117, and 118. IUPAC oversees chemical nomenclature and terminology, as well as other critically-evaluated chemical data.

ANS member Julie Ezold, an isotope program manager at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), was one of a team of ORNL scientists involved in the discovery of moscovium (formerly known as element 115) and tennessine (element 117). In fact, the name “tennessine” was chosen to acknowledge the ORNL team’s contribution. Describing the experience, Ezold, who has an eight-year-old daughter, said, “That is just something amazing, that when she studies science, I can point to that and say, ‘I was part of that’ ”.

Discovering an element is a lengthy process but you can demonstrate it with videos you’ll find on YouTube. SciShow’s amusing presentation of the discovery of elements 113, 115, 117, and 118 also provides an interesting look into how any element is discovered and named. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s animation goes into detail to illustrate the process used to create just a few atoms of tennessine.

In addition to ORNL, scientists from the Joint Institute of Nuclear Research and the Research Institute for Advanced Reactors, both located in Russia, as well as Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California, Vanderbilt University in Tennessee, and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, contributed to experiments which lead to the discovery.

It’s not too early to start planning your professional development activities for the summer.  Here are three inspiring nuclear science workshops sponsored by the ANS Center for Nuclear Science and Technology Information or an ANS local or student section. They will enhance your ability to ensure student success. All are popular, and space is limited, so plan to register as soon as possible.

 

Detecting Radiation in Our Radioactive World

June 10, 8 am – 5 pm

Hyatt Regency, San Francisco, CA

Qualifies for .7 CEUs

Work alongside university professors and nuclear professionals as you learn experiments and activities designed to further student understanding. You’ll leave the workshop ready to engage students in learning about nuclear science. You’ll receive a free CD-V vintage Geiger Mueller counter to take back to your classroom. And, thanks to a generous donation from Southern Nuclear, you’ll also receive a complementary cloud chamber kit, classroom-safe radiation sources, and other materials. Registration is open.

 

Nuclear Science & Engineering for Secondary Science Teachers

June 12 – 16

University of Missouri Research Reactor Center, Columbia, MO

Eligible for 3 Graduate Credit Hours

This one-week course, designed specifically for high school science teachers, provides the basics of nuclear science, types of radiation, radiation detection and protection, industrial applications of nuclear science, and current and future nuclear power generation technologies. In addition to classroom work, the course includes demonstrations of reactor control and materials analysis methods, including Neutron Activation Analysis and X-Ray Fluorescence. Tours during the course will include the Callaway Nuclear Center, the University of Missouri’s Research Reactor Facility, and MU’s Nuclear Medicine therapy and diagnostic clinics. Registration is open.

 

2017 Four Day Teacher Workshop

July 24-28

Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA

Qualifies for 4.0 CEUs

The goal of this workshop is to sharpen educators’ knowledge and understanding of nuclear energy and radiation, enabling them to provide students with factual, up-to-date information about nuclear science and technology. The workshop features laboratories and hands-on activities as well as tours of North Anna Nuclear Power Station and VCU’s Nuclear Medicine facilities. Receive a free Geiger-Muller counter to take back to your classroom. Registration is open.

This Earth Day, turn your students into energy planners with Power Play, an interactive online game from the Ontario Ministry of Energy that lets students create an energy mix to meet the electricity needs of a city of the future. To play the game, students manipulate supply and demand by choosing from a variety of energy options. Selecting sources is only half of the game, though. Students may also meet their cities’ energy needs by reducing demand from energy consumers. As students select their mix, sliders across the bottom of the screen show availability, impact on emissions, and cost of the source.

You can up the need for critical thinking skills by providing energy plan challenges and then have students defend their choice either through a persuasive essay or group presentation. Some parameters to consider are a designing a plan focused solely on cost, one that minimizes emissions, or a plan that optimizes all three dimensions.

Events
June 10, 2017 Detecting Radiation in Our Radioactive World Hyatt Regency, San Francisco, CA

Join ANS for a full-day exploration of nuclear and radiation science. You’ll work alongside our nuclear professionals gaining knowledge and inspiration that will leave you ready to engage your students about learning nuclear science. Every participant receives the ANS Teacher Resource Guide full of interactive lessons aligned to NGSS standards as well as a FREE Geiger counter to take back to their classroom. Registration required.

June 12-16, 2017 Nuclear Science and Engineering for Secondary Science Teachers University of Missouri, Columbia, MO

This one-week course, designed specifically for high school science teachers, provides the basics of nuclear science, types of radiation, radiation detection and protection, industrial applications of nuclear science, and current and future nuclear power generation technologies. In addition to classroom work, the course includes demonstrations of reactor control and materials analysis methods, including Neutron Activation Analysis and X-Ray Fluorescence. Tours during the course will include the Callaway Nuclear Center, the University of Missouri’s Research Reactor Facility, and MU’s Nuclear Medicine therapy and diagnostic clinics. SPACE IS LIMITED.

Registration required at: www.murr.missouri.edu/et_secondaryst.php

July 24-28, 2017 The Science of Nuclear Energy & Radiation Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA

Sharpen your knowledge and understanding of nuclear energy and radiation, so you can inspire students with factual, up-to-date information about nuclear science and technology. The workshop features laboratories and hands-on activities as well as tours of North Anna Nuclear Power Station and VCU’s Nuclear Medicine facilities. Receive a free Geiger-Muller counter to take back to your classroom. Course fee: $75. Registration deadline: June 30, 2016.

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